Should You Make The Step To Personal Personal Bankruptcy?

Even when faced with dire financial consequences, many people fear the prospect of filing personal bankruptcy. The key to defeating what can, often be, crippling anxiety is familiarizing yourself with the process and its potential benefits. Use the tips in this article to alleviate your fears and do what is necessary to get a fresh financial start.

Don't be afraid to apply for credit for purchases such as a new home or car just because you have a recently discharged bankruptcy. Many lenders will take your new financial situation into account. They may be more likely to loan money to someone who has no debt due to a bankruptcy than to the person with, say, 75,000 dollars in credit card debt. The fact that you have no monthly credit card payments can make you look like a better risk.

Never give up. Once bankruptcy has been filed, you may be able to regain possession of items such as electronic goods or cars that were taken away from you. If you have property repossessed less than ninety days prior to filing your bankruptcy, you may be able to get it back. Discuss your options with a good lawyer who can help you with the filing of your bankruptcy petition.


Remember you still have to pay taxes on your debts. A lot of people don't realize that even if their debts are discharged in the bankruptcy, they are still responsible to the IRS. The IRS usually does not allow complete forgiveness, although payment plans are common. Make sure to find out what is covered and what is not.



If you choose to file Chapter 13 bankruptcy, be sure that the amount of your monthly payments is within your reach. If you set a payment that is more than you can afford, you may face a court order of liquidation of all of your assets. You will lose everything by falling behind on payments.

Know the difference between Chapters 7 and 13 bankruptcies. Chapter 7 will wipe your debts clean, meaning you will not owe what you file against. Chapter 13 requires you to agree to repay your debts. These debts need to be repaid within three to five years of the filing date.

You do not need to be bankrupt to file for personal bankruptcy. In 1898 the term was changed from "bankrupt" to "debtor" so that people could more readily understand that an inability to pay bills is the main qualifying factor in filing for personal bankruptcy. Most people who file are not, in fact, completely bankrupt.

Before you consider filing for bankruptcy, you should make a pre-determination if bankruptcy may be the right choice. First, make a list of all income, including, salary, child support, alimony, rent and any other sources you may have. Then, make a list of your bills. These would include mortgage, rent, car payments, monthly credit card payments, groceries and gas. If your monthly bill total is more than the income you bring in, it may be time to seek the advice of a bankruptcy attorney, who can help you make the final decision.

If you lose your job, or otherwise face a financial crisis after filing Chapter 13, contact your trustee immediately. If you don't pay your Chapter 13 payment on time, your trustee can request that your bankruptcy be dismissed. You may need to modify your Chapter 13 plan if, you are unable to pay the agreed-upon amount.

A good personal bankruptcy tip is to be well versed in all of the rules when it comes to filing for bankruptcy. The last thing you would want is to be penalized, or taxed by the IRS. They do indeed tax some of the debt that you've managed to get rid of.

Look into Chapter 12 bankruptcy if you are a family farmer. The purpose of this chapter is to reorganize the farming business so that it can remain operative. Chapter 12 bankruptcy can be filed by single-owner farms or partnerships. Be aware that there is a ceiling on the amount of debt for these filings.

Do not cosign on any type of loan during or after your bankruptcy. Because you cannot file for bankruptcy again for many years, you will be on the hook for the debt if the person for whom you are cosigning is unable to meet his or her financial obligation. You must do whatever you can to keep your record clean.

Prior to filing for personal bankruptcy, take care to not make withdrawals from your retirement accounts, IRA's, or 401k's. You may think you are doing the right thing to free up money, but often these types of accounts are protected from any bankruptcy proceedings. If you withdrawal the money, you may be opening it up to any bankruptcy action.

In order to file for bankruptcy, you'll need professional legal assistance. https://www.newsday.com/business/columnists/carrie-mason-draffen/help-wanted-shortages-garnish-1.15073903 in the process you find legal counsel, the better. Do not worry about the expense of a bankruptcy attorney. Most lawyers who specialize in this field understand, your financial difficulties. The sooner you start taking advantage of their expert advice, the better off you will be.

Before filing for bankruptcy, talk with your creditors and see if there is anything that can be done to reduce the amount of your debt. Most creditors will work with you because they want you to pay them back their money. If you actually file for bankruptcy, they will lose their money.

Never rely upon bill collectors to share accurate information about your debt and bankruptcy. Some unethical collectors tell consumers that their debts are exempt from bankruptcy rules, but this is actually only true for a few special kinds of debt. If a collection agency provides you with inaccurate information like this, report them to the Attorney General's Office in your state.

Put the date for your 341 meeting with creditors on your calendar as soon as you get it, so that you don't forget this meeting. You need to attend the 341 meeting and answer all of the trustee's questions as honestly as possible, in order to get your debts discharged.

Always be honest in reporting all income, assets and debts when filing bankruptcy. If you hide any financial information, whether it is intentional or accidental, you run the risk of being barred from filing bankruptcy on those debts listed in your original bankruptcy petition in the future, which means you will have no relief from your financial burdens.

As you can probably see, personal bankruptcy is not a magic pill that makes all of your debts just vanish. However, in certain situations, it is a viable option. Managing your finances takes discipline and a certain amount of financial knowledge. Hopefully, this article has shed some light on personal bankruptcy, and whether it makes sense for you.

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